Tag Archives: Sauvignon Blanc

Grilled Shrimp Skewers with Citrus Salsa

Whip up these delicious game day appetizers before you put the grill away for winter.

We’ve partnered with [Yellow Tail] PURE BRIGHT, Wine for All Occasions for the month of October, and we promise it’s all treats and no tricks. We look forward to sharing delicious recipes and wine cocktails, courtesy of Yellow Tail Wine. You can find last week’s post here, Warm Feta, Olive & Sun-Dried Tomato Spread.

Note: If using wood skewers, soak in water at least 10 minutes before threading shrimp.

GRILLED SHRIMP SKEWERS WITH CITRUS SALSA


Ingredients

Serves 4

Grilled Shrimp Skewers

  • 1 lime
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
  • ¼ tsp pepper
  • 1 lb large shrimp, peeled and deveined (tail on or off)
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 4 skewers, about 12” long (if using wood skewers, pre-soak them in water)

Citrus Salsa

  • ½ cup orange segments, cut into small pieces
  • ½ cup diced fresh mango
  • ¼ cup finely chopped orange or yellow bell pepper 
  • 2 tbsp. orange juice
  • 3 tbsp. snipped fresh chives
  • 1 tsp. minced garlic
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Zest the lime into a small bowl. Cover and set aside.
  2. Squeeze juice from lime and reserve.
  3. In large resealable plastic bag, mix olive oil, reserved lime juice, garlic, salt, red pepper flakes and pepper.  
  4. Add shrimp, seal bag and place in refrigerator. Marinate shrimp for at least 20 minutes, but not longer than 2 hours.
  5. Preheat grill to medium-high.
  6. Thread shrimp on skewers. 
  7. Place skewers on grill; cook 2 to 3 minutes per side or until shrimp are opaque and pink.
  8. Sprinkle shrimp with reserved lime zest and chopped parsley.

Citrus Salsa

  1. Combine ingredients in medium bowl. Serve with grilled shrimp.

Perfectly paired with PURE BRIGHT Sauvignon Blanc


Recipe courtesy [Yellow Tail] PURE BRIGHT

garlic and herb roasted chicken thighs

Weeknight schedules get busy and life can whisk by in a flash. It’s so tempting to sail in to the drive thru on the way home or use a meal delivery option once cozily inside the house, but it isn’t always the healthiest for you or the fam.

chicken partsKeeping a few simple, delicious and healthy recipes on file is how we make it through each week here at basil’s little farm house, yet that’s not always enough. To stay on track and to maximize time and flavors, a weekly menu and a few minutes set aside each evening for next day pre-prep is essential.

I love this dish because it works any time of year and is entirely seasonal. Chicken is my go to fave, and when it comes to herbs I recommend you use what you like best.  Whatever you have growing in your outdoor or kitchen herb garden or even a great find at the farmers market or your local grocer.

My side dish pairing in the warm summer weather is seasonal, roasted vegetables. Rice, pasta and potatoes work very well as we move deeper into the year and crave heavier foods and flavors.

My wine pairing recommendation, is a chilled glass of Pedroncelli’s Sauvignon Blanc. Cheers!

As always, I am raising a glass to you.


Note: While I love this recipe as is, I often nix the cream altogether, adding a bit more wine and chicken stock, then toss in a few thin lemon slices, giving it a lighter fresh flavor for summer.

garlic and herb roasted chicken thighs

Prep Time 5 mins  |  Cook Time 45 mins

garlic and herb roasted chickenIngredients

Chicken thighs 

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 pounds chicken thighs bone-in and skin-on, 6 to 8 thighs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper

White Wine Sauce

  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, whole
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • ½ cup white wine
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 3 to 4 thyme sprigs, leaves only for cooking
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter in large skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle chicken thighs with salt and pepper.
  3. Cook thighs on medium-high with skin side down first to brown for 4-5 minutes. Using tongs, turn thighs over and cook for an additional 4 minutes, for an approximate total of 8-10 minutes. Remove chicken from skillet and set aside.
  4. In same skillet, add 1 tablespoon butter and onion and sauté until the onion is browned, about 3-4 minutes. Add garlic and thyme, cook for another minute.
  5. Add 1 tablespoon flour and cook for about a minute, until it’s no longer white in color. Add wine slowly and increase heat from medium-high to high and cook for a few minutes.
  6. Add chicken stock and heavy cream, stirring to combine until it reduces slightly, about 5 minutes. Now is the time to sample sauce to see if more salt and or pepper is needed.
  7. Return chicken thighs back to pan and place pan in oven, uncovered for 35 minutes. Check for doneness and add fresh thyme or herbs of choice and serve with roasted vegetables.



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Thank you for visiting basil & salt! We look forward to bringing you great content for gardening, parenting, health and beauty and of course, delicious recipes.

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As always, I am raising a glass to you. Karie



You can find us on facebook and instagram @basilandsalt email: karie@basilandsalt.com



profile picKarie Engels is an author, founder and publisher of Basil & Salt Magazine. She enjoys a quiet life in a small farmhouse in Washington state with her quarrelsome cat.


Vine Buzz: Warm Weather Sips by Maxine Borcherding

Maxine Borcherding

Maxine Borcherding

Sippin’ wine on the porch in summer – but what to drink? From Oregon Culinary Institute — Portland’s only independent culinary school — sommelier/instructor Maxine Borcherding has just the advice you need for drinking with tips for whites, reds & rosés–juice that you can enjoy by themselves or with just about any summer foods.

Her tips:

White: Sauvignon Blanc – bright, refreshing, full of citrus flavors that can range from meyer lemon to grapefruit, and a delightful grassy note.  Sauv Blancs grown in different parts of the world can have different profiles, and they are all delicious. Its refreshing acidity makes it one of the rare wines that pair well with a tart vinaigrette, and classic food pairings also include fresh oysters and goat cheese. Try one with a summer salad of mixed greens (make sure some of them have a bit of crunch) with fresh grapefruit and tangy goat cheese with a citrus vinaigrette. The grassy notes in Sauv Blanc make it a great pairing with asparagus- in fact it is one of the rare wines that work well with this early messenger of spring. Try it with grilled asparagus served with a lemon dill caper mayonnaise. Look for a Sancerre such as Domaine Vincent Gaudy Sanncerre “le Tournebride” from the Loire Valley, one of Jules Taylor’s Sauvignon Blancs from Marlborough, New Zealand, or a delicious and incredibly inexpensive Sauv Blanc from chile’s Cono Sur.

Rosé: Rosé was made for warm weather, and one of my absolute favorites is the Lucien Albrecht Brut Rose Cremant d’Alsace. This lovely sparkler is made from 100% Pinot noir. Sparkling wines go beautifully with fried and salty foods, and pinot noir is great with truffles- so try this lovely Rosé with fresh, crisp truffle fries, or popcorn topped with butter and truffle salt (my mouth is watering)-or pair with a light pasta salad topped with smoked salmon, olives, caramelized onions, and fresh basil.

Red: A low tannin red such as Gamay from southern Beaujolais, such as a Louis Jadot Beaujolais Village, is one of the most versatile wines on the planet; and since it can be served with a light chill, it is perfect for summer. Try it on a soft blanket under a shady tree by the bank of a lazy river with a sandwich of roasted eggplant, caramelized onion, roasted red pepper and soft cheese drizzled with olive oil and balsamic vinegar on a really good baguette. Ain’t summer grand?

You can read more articles by Maxine at her blog: In Maxine’s Glass 

Maxine Borcherding is the Lead Chef Instructor, Certified Sommelier and Certified Spanish Wine Educator at The Oregon Culinary Institute.

Simple Summer Pairings; Pairing the Right Wine with Warm Weather Favorites

The irony of sitting down and writing this article is that my heater is on in my house and it is pouring rain. It is time to get a little imaginative. Let’s pretend it is 80 degrees, you have been playing on your boat all day, returned home and it is time to sit out on the deck with a few summer favorites.

Pouilly Fume

Pouilly Fume

Let’s begin with a nice salad, Grilled kale salad with ricotta and plums. Keep in mind that kale is a little bitter and now we have put a char on it. What to pair? The Quintessence Pouilly Fume. This is a 100% Sauvignon Blanc wine from producer Pierre Chainier, this French beauty would be a great choice to pair. A wine with bright acidity and a clean, crisp taste. It has aromas of flowers, a hint of smokiness and a creamy texture. A great way to start your summer meal.

A Lisa

A Lisa

Now we are moving on in the meal to the steak on the grill. If you are going carnivore for the evening, look for a wine that is bold and will hold up to the slab of cow you are getting ready to enjoy. How about the Bodega Noemia “A Lisa” Malbec from Argentina. This is produced south of Buenos Aires. If you are looking for balance, boldness and a simply delicious Malbec, look no further. Give this time ample time to open up but when it does, you will be glad you did.

New Age

New Age

At this point, you should be in a food coma and possibly unable to move, but wanting one last thing to finish off the evening….I know, you are thinking, I can’t eat another bite but, something light would be nice.   Drink a bit of water to help the palate recover from the red meat and Malbec and pour a white wine from New Age, another wine from Argentina. This light refreshing wine is made from Torrontes grapes and it is really great just by itself. Fill a glass with ice, yes ice. Pour the wine and add a slice of lime. It is a cool, refreshing and light way to end the meal on a warm summers evening. This wine is low in alcohol and really is dessert by itself.

These are obviously three very distinct wines but, a great way to explore flavors and pairings.

Until Next Time,

Cheers!

If you are going carnivore for the evening, look for a wine that is bold and will hold up to the slab of cow you are getting ready to enjoy

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington

Author:  Jack Chase

Edited by:  Karie Engels

 

Vine Buzz; Wines to pair with Light Fresh Dishes for Spring by Jack Chase

As we move into Spring, we tend to start thinking about lighter meals. Enjoying fresh, seasonal foods and even thinking about cooking and eating outdoors. The temperature is getting a little warmer so why not look at opening up a few different wines to pair with these foods?

Pine Ridge Chenin

Pine Ridge Chenin

Let’s face it. Who doesn’t like a nice salad in the Spring? Look for wines that will pair well with the various combinations of ingredients and dressings that you could possibly use. For the dressings that have a bit more acidity, I like to open a bottle of the Pine Ridge Chenin Blanc/Viognier blend. With a crisp and slighty off dry profile, it will be a great pairing with that salad or even a light seafood dish.

Mohua Sauvignon Blanc

Mohua Sauvignon Blanc

Perhaps Mussels in a white wine and garlic broth? Take a look at the Mohua Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand. A wine with citrus in the aroma and the flavor profile, this value priced Sauvignon Blanc will not leave you disappointed. It also pairs well with fresh spring rolls as well as foods utilizing curry.

If a light pasta dish is on the brain, say a Spaghetti with Lemon Zest and Chives, try a Pinot Grigio from Italy. Lately I have been enjoying the Torre Di Luna Pinot Grigio from Trentino. With hints of pear and minerals, this wine will not only go easy on the pocket book but will be a great edition to the light pasta meal.

Archery Summit

Archery Summit

Finally, if you are already thinking Grilled Salmon, why not pair it with a great Pinot Noir? I have always enjoyed the Archery Summit Premier Cuvee from the Willamette Valley. You will find hints of spice and licorice in this wine finishing with cherry and a bit of chocolate. While not the value of the previously mentioned wines, please treat yourself. It is well worth it and when you pair it with that Grilled Salmon, it will be a meal, not soon forgotten.

I hope everyone is enjoying Spring and counting the days until the warm weather is here. Be adventurous in your food and wine pairings this year. You just may stumble across a new favorite.

Cheers until next time!

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase; Whites, Wines with Body and Complexity

Author:  Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

I find myself wanting to write just a little about those white wines that tend to bring something very special to the table. Quite often, I drink these wines with food, but not always. My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Italian whites; you may want to look for a great Falanghina, Fiano di Avellino or Greco di Tufo. These wines each bring their own characteristics but with bright acidity and hints of mineral.

South Africa; The two whites that I tend to gravitate towards are Chenin Blanc and Sauvignon Blanc. The flavor profiles can be extensive in wines from this part of the world and they are simply delicious.

New Zealand;  Generally when I choose a Sauvignon Blanc, it is almost always from this country.  New Zealand is producing incredible wines and Sauvignon Blanc is a varietal that is shining for this country. The wines are very food friendly but are equally delicious on their own.

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

France; If you want explore something French, try White wines from Burgundy. The Chardonnay that is produced here is among the best in the world.  The wines are incredibly food friendly and they tend to bring unique qualities that can only be found in wines from this region.

I invite you all to try these wines, if you have not already and enjoy them as the weather begins to warm.  I do realize this is a very brief overview of these wines, I hope it will spark some interest in a wine that otherwise may go unnoticed.  If you have any questions about these wines, please feel free to contact me with comments, suggestions or inquiries.

My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Cheers for now!

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington

Edited;  Karie Engels    

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase; Whites, Wines with Body and Complexity

Author:  Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

I find myself wanting to write just a little about those white wines that tend to bring something very special to the table. Quite often, I drink these wines with food, but not always. My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Italian whites; you may want to look for a great Falanghina, Fiano di Avellino or Greco di Tufo. These wines each bring their own characteristics but with bright acidity and hints of mineral.

South Africa; The two whites that I tend to gravitate towards are Chenin Blanc and Sauvignon Blanc. The flavor profiles can be extensive in wines from this part of the world and they are simply delicious.

New Zealand;  Generally when I choose a Sauvignon Blanc, it is almost always from this country.  New Zealand is producing incredible wines and Sauvignon Blanc is a varietal that is shining for this country. The wines are very food friendly but are equally delicious on their own.

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

France; If you want explore something French, try White wines from Burgundy. The Chardonnay that is produced here is among the best in the world.  The wines are incredibly food friendly and they tend to bring unique qualities that can only be found in wines from this region.

I invite you all to try these wines, if you have not already and enjoy them as the weather begins to warm.  I do realize this is a very brief overview of these wines, I hope it will spark some interest in a wine that otherwise may go unnoticed.  If you have any questions about these wines, please feel free to contact me with comments, suggestions or inquiries.

My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Cheers for now!

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington

Edited;  Karie Engels