Tag Archives: Chardonnay

Warm Feta, Olive & Sun-Dried Tomato Spread

Cozy up to a hot fire with crusty bread, warm feta spread and Yellow Tail’s Pure Bright Chardonnay

We’ve been seeing this baked feta trend all over TikTok and couldn’t wait to try it ourselves. This recipe leaves so much room for improvisation, add your own favorite ingredients and make it uniquely yours.

Warm Feta, Olive & Sun-Dried Tomato Spread

Serves 4 to 6


Ingredients

  • ⅔ cup mixed olives (pitted)
  • ¼ cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil
  • ¼ cup chopped roasted red peppers 
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh oregano  
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. pepper
  • ⅛ tsp. red pepper flakes
  • 1 block (about 8 ounces) feta cheese, drained and patted dry 
  • Fresh lemon zest
  • 1 baguette, thinly sliced and toasted – Essential Baking Company Take & Bake Bread

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°.
  2. Place cheese in shallow baking dish that allows for some room around the cheese.
  3. Mix olives, sun-dried tomatoes and roasted peppers in medium bowl.
  4. Spoon olive mixture around feta cheese.
  5. In separate bowl, whisk together olive oil, garlic, oregano, lemon juice, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes.
  6. Pour the oil mixture over feta cheese and olives in baking dish.
  7. Bake 20 minutes; then turn oven to Broil setting. 
  8. Broil cheese about 2 minutes or until cheese begins to brown.
  9. Sprinkle with lemon zest and serve with toasted baguette slices.

Paired Perfectly with Yellow Tail’s Purge Bright Chardonnay – available at online retailers like Drizly and Total Wine for easy ordering.

2016 International Chardonnay Symposium Pays Homage To France

Producers from the birthplace of Chardonnay, and a much-anticipated French Forum panel discussion, will be featured at the upcoming annual celebration.

wine-glasses-empty-white-glass IIThe International Chardonnay Symposium, the world’s foremost gathering of top global Chardonnay winemakers, sommeliers, journalists, wine industry leaders, foodies and oenephiles will feature a star-studded panel and guided tasting tour of the most storied and seminal Chardonnay regions in France at this year’s celebration May 12-14.

“France has long been the standard-bearer of Chardonnay, and this spotlight and panel discussion comes at an exciting time since France’s classic, lean-and-bright style is clearly influencing winemakers the world over, especially here in California,” says Brian Talley, a Symposium advisory board member and owner of Talley Vineyards in Arroyo Grande, California.

Several French producers will be pouring at the Grand Tasting on Saturday, May 14, and attendees of the French Forum on Friday, May 13 will participate in an expert-led exploration of France’s quintessential Chardonnay regions, such as Chablis Champagne, Montrachet, Pouilly-Fuissé, Languedoc-Roussillon and Meursault.

Moderated by Master Sommelier Bob Bath, from the Culinary Institute of America, the French Forum panel includes Claude Rouquet from the Boisset Collection, Bruno Laclotte from Charton et Trebuchet, Bernard Retornez from Maison Louis Latour, Jean-Rèmy Rapeneau from Champagne G.H. Martel, Kyle Kaplan from Piper-Heidsieck, and Geoffroy de La Besnardière from Domaine de l’Arjolle.

The French Forum is but one of many panel discussions and happenings at this annual global gathering set among the stunning coastal communities of Pismo Beach, Avila Beach and the Edna Valley wine region.

The other panel discussions include:

  • Wente Clone Comparative Tasting
  • What’s Oak Got to Do With It?
  • Pairing Chardonnay With Artisanal Cheeses
  • Taste the Difference: Exploring California’s Distinct Chardonnay Regions
  • Hone Your Chardonnay Blind-Tasting Skills

The Grand Tasting, with 80-plus wineries, will be held at the picturesque Greengate Ranch & Vineyard (GreengateWeddings.com) on Saturday, May 14. Additional events include a Vintners’ Wine Tech Symposium, Sommelier Chardonnay Challenge, La Paulée Dinner and Vintners Awards Ceremony, and new to this year’s Symposium, the Pét-Nat/Sparkling Wine & Oysters Gala.

For more information on the Symposium, and for tickets to the Grand Tasting or other events —including the French Forum— please visit TheChardonnaySymposium.com. For photos from last year’s event  here.

About The International Chardonnay Symposium

The International Chardonnay Symposium attracts winemakers, sommeliers, media, trade, foodies, wine enthusiasts and tastemakers from across the globe to enjoy and study the world’s favorite grape. When the discussion ends, there’s plenty of time for exploring nearby Central Coast wineries as well as the hosting seaside resort towns of Pismo Beach and Avila Beach that offer downtown winetasting rooms, pristine beaches, surfing and kayaking, hiking and biking trails, farm-to-table and seaport-inspired cuisine, boutique shopping, and more. The International Chardonnay Symposium is sponsored by Pismo Beach Conference & Visitors Bureau, Avila Beach Tourism Alliance, California Highway 1 Discovery Route, Visit San Luis Obispo County, The Tasting Panel Magazine, The SOMM Journal, Wine Enthusiast Magazine,Touring & Tasting, Greengate Ranch & Vineyard, and 805 Living.

About Pismo Beach, Avila Beach, & Highway 1 Discovery Route of SLO County

San Luis Obispo County’s Pismo Beach, Avila Beach and the Highway 1 Discovery Route destination towns are located on California’s famous Central Coast, halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. With miles of pristine Pacific coastline, enjoy great weather, a plethora of outdoor activities, rich wild life and nature preserves, downtown wine tasting rooms, and the neighboring world class wine producing regions of the Edna Valley, Arroyo Grande Valley, Santa Maria Valley and Paso Robles. For information on the wide variety of lodging choices, accommodating every budget and lifestyle, visit Classiccalifornia.com, VisitAvilaBeach.com,VisitSanLuisObispoCounty.com and Highway1DiscoveryRoute.com.

Content provided by the Chardonnay Symposium

2010 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay by Matthew Rinkerman

2010 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay

2010 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay

Winemaker’s Notes: 

Pale golden color in the glass, with the faintest hint of green belying its youth, this Chardonnay opens with rich and intense aromas of lemon, lime leaf, citrus flowers, and a touch of honey before moving into spicy pie crust and a hint of mascarpone creaminess – all topped with a nice flinty finish. The citrus trend continues on the palate with a firm acidity and tropical star fruit. This wine has excellent mouthfeel with big full texture and a mouthcoating creaminess that nicely complements the white stone fruit (nectarine and peach) and slight green apple fruit flavors. On the finish, look for a pleasantly subtle marzipan nuttiness.

92 Points The Wine Advocate

“The 2010 Chardonnay is quite a bit fresher and more linear than the 2009, partly because of the length of the growing season, partly because it is a year younger. Slate, minerals, crushed rocks and grapefruit linger on the precise, crystalline finish. This is a very Chablis-like Napa Valley Chardonnay. Anticipated maturity: 2014-2022.”

91 Points International Wine Cellar

“Pale bright yellow. Complex, brisk aromas of musky pineapple, medicinal herbs, white pepper and licorice; hardly your typical California Chardonnay! At once dense and penetrating, with a strong spine of acidity and some unabsorbed SO2 currently hardening the middle palate. This rather uncompromising no-malolactic Chardonnay displays a serious structure for aging, and will probably need five to seven years to soften up and come into harmony. Assistant winemaker Matthew Crafton noted that in the cool growing season of 2010 it was a challenge to ripen Chardonnay in cooler sites in Napa Valley.

Contributed by Matthew Rinkerman

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase; Summer Sipping ~ Choosing the Perfect Chardonnay

Chardonnay has always been a wine that I have enjoyed. It is produced with so much variation and presents itself in many styles. When pairing this varietal with food though, it may present challenges due to these stylistic differences. I would like to look at a few different versions of this varietal and give readers the opportunity to explore some new wines.

revA wine that I recently discovered is the Revelry Vintners Chardonnay from the Columbia Valley. Washington is producing great Chardonnay and this wine will not disappoint. This is a Chardonnay that presents itself as rich and crisp. You will find hints of mineral and pear flavors with a bright acidity, which makes it approachable and delicious. Pour a glass soon and try it out.

rombauerLooking for the quintessential Carneros Chardonnay? Look no further than Rombauer Carneros Chardonnay. This wine shows aromas of pear and vanilla. The creamy texture it lends to the palate is a pleasure with hints of pineapple and apricot in the flavor profile. This is a Chardonnay made in the typical Carneros style with a subtlety and elegance that will be a joy in the mouth. Try it with a Salmon Fettuccine.

CaptureWe can’t possibly talk about Chardonnay without looking at France. The Nicolas Potel Pouilly Fuisse is a stunning Chardonnay from Burgundy. It has a mineral driven flavor profile with a creamy texture and you will find apple and peach in the flavors. On its own, this wine shines, but feel free to pair it with Mussels in a white wine broth.

PrintFinally, let’s talk about a Chardonnay that never hits the barrel. The Chamisal Vineyards Stainless Chardonnay from California’s Central Coast. Not only is this wine an incredible value, it is just fun to drink. Clean and crisp, this wine shows flavors of apple, lemon and pear. Due to the fact it has never seen oak, allows this wine to broaden the spectrum of food pairing options. Explore a bottle. Maybe try a side by side comparison of this wine versus an oaked Chardonnay.

For all of the Chardonnay lovers out there, I hope this has you looking at new options. If done correctly in whatever style you prefer, this can be a great wine to enjoy.

When pairing this varietal with food though, it may present challenges due to these stylistic differences. I would like to look at a few different versions of this varietal and give readers the opportunity to explore some new wines.

Cheers until next time!

Mussels in White WineJack suggested a fantastic pairing of Nicolas Potel Pouilly Fuisse and Mussels in White Wine.  I just happen to have a great one. Follow the link :)  Steamed Mussels in White Wine

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase; Whites, Wines with Body and Complexity

Author:  Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

I find myself wanting to write just a little about those white wines that tend to bring something very special to the table. Quite often, I drink these wines with food, but not always. My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Italian whites; you may want to look for a great Falanghina, Fiano di Avellino or Greco di Tufo. These wines each bring their own characteristics but with bright acidity and hints of mineral.

South Africa; The two whites that I tend to gravitate towards are Chenin Blanc and Sauvignon Blanc. The flavor profiles can be extensive in wines from this part of the world and they are simply delicious.

New Zealand;  Generally when I choose a Sauvignon Blanc, it is almost always from this country.  New Zealand is producing incredible wines and Sauvignon Blanc is a varietal that is shining for this country. The wines are very food friendly but are equally delicious on their own.

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

France; If you want explore something French, try White wines from Burgundy. The Chardonnay that is produced here is among the best in the world.  The wines are incredibly food friendly and they tend to bring unique qualities that can only be found in wines from this region.

I invite you all to try these wines, if you have not already and enjoy them as the weather begins to warm.  I do realize this is a very brief overview of these wines, I hope it will spark some interest in a wine that otherwise may go unnoticed.  If you have any questions about these wines, please feel free to contact me with comments, suggestions or inquiries.

My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Cheers for now!

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington

Edited;  Karie Engels    

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase; Whites, Wines with Body and Complexity

Author:  Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

Whites with Jack Chase

I find myself wanting to write just a little about those white wines that tend to bring something very special to the table. Quite often, I drink these wines with food, but not always. My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Italian whites; you may want to look for a great Falanghina, Fiano di Avellino or Greco di Tufo. These wines each bring their own characteristics but with bright acidity and hints of mineral.

South Africa; The two whites that I tend to gravitate towards are Chenin Blanc and Sauvignon Blanc. The flavor profiles can be extensive in wines from this part of the world and they are simply delicious.

New Zealand;  Generally when I choose a Sauvignon Blanc, it is almost always from this country.  New Zealand is producing incredible wines and Sauvignon Blanc is a varietal that is shining for this country. The wines are very food friendly but are equally delicious on their own.

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

Vine Buzz with Jack Chase

France; If you want explore something French, try White wines from Burgundy. The Chardonnay that is produced here is among the best in the world.  The wines are incredibly food friendly and they tend to bring unique qualities that can only be found in wines from this region.

I invite you all to try these wines, if you have not already and enjoy them as the weather begins to warm.  I do realize this is a very brief overview of these wines, I hope it will spark some interest in a wine that otherwise may go unnoticed.  If you have any questions about these wines, please feel free to contact me with comments, suggestions or inquiries.

My suggestion for this week is to look for wines from Italy, France, South Africa and New Zealand.

Cheers for now!

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington

Edited;  Karie Engels    

Exploring New Wines. What to Buy? So many Choices!

Author:  Jack Chase

Jack Chase of Wine Tasting Washington

Jack Chase of Wine Tasting Washington

Let’s face it. We all have our favorite, go to wine, that we drink on a regular basis. I hear it all the time. I like Sweet wines, I only drink Red wines. Well, what does that mean?

There are many different reds and countless sweet wines. So I present this thought. Why, as consumers, do we get in this rut of drinking the same thing over and over? Well the obvious answer is, we like it but, what if there were other wines that you like and aren’t aware that they even exist. Wines you have never heard of or tried or don’t have access to? I propose taking the plunge. Trying something completely different. Let’s get out of our comfort zone and be adventurous.

We can start by talking about White wines

As I mentioned earlier, I am often told at tastings, I only like sweet wines. My guess is because the sugar content is much higher and of course, who doesn’t like something with a little sugar? I always try and explain that wines that are sweet are generally not the best to pair with a meal. Maybe try a nice Riesling with a little higher alcohol content, if it is above 10.5%, it is not going to be as sweet. Having a salad for dinner with a Grilled Trout? Maybe think about a Chenin Blanc or Viognier or even Falanghina from Italy, white wines with more acidity and less residual sugar. Then there is Chardonnay. I often find the Chardonnay’s that are big in the “Butter and Oak” flavor profile, are not always the easiest to pair with food. Possibly consider an Un-Oaked Chardonnay. The wine is always in stainless and tends to have a profile that lends itself to being more food friendly. Thai Sushi and Idian Foods? Sauvignon Blanc, a great wine with hints of citrus and tends to pair up nicely with these foods. I am very much enjoying many of these wines coming from New Zealand.

Now let’s chat about Red wines

Photo Credit:  Jack Chase

Photo Credit: Jack Chase

Here is a scenario that I see often. You are at your favorite Italian Restaurant. The table next to you orders a bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon to go with their Spaghetti Pomodoro. Well, me being the trouble maker that I am and letting my curiosity get the best of me, lean to ask, “With all these lovely Italian wines on this list, may I ask why you chose a Cabernet from California”? Now of course I wouldn’t really be that nosy but, it is going through my mind. I have heard this answer before, Well, Italians drink red wines with their meals. Why yes they do but generally not Cabernet Sauvignon. My point here is that as we enjoy are way through the fabulous world of wines, we should try and avoid lumping all white wines or all red wines together by stating, I like whites. I like reds. Alright, back to the Red wine dilemma. With Italian food, especially anything tomato based, try a wine that is blended with Sangiovese. A Chianti perhaps? If you are looking for a red wine that is not so heavy, try a beautiful Pinot Noir. Especially from Chile. You can find great values in some of these wines. I also find that a red wine from the Rhone Valley tends to have earthy components and a complexity that lends itself to food and if you are a lover of the Cabernet Sauvignon, pair it with a meal of substance. Yes, I am speaking to the carnivores out there. Try to keep in mind that this article is barely scratching the surface of the choices we have when it comes to wine. I am hopeful that you will run out to your local store tonight and pull something off the shelf that you would not normally purchase and enjoy something new.

Cheers until next time!

Jack Chase of Wine Tasting Washington

winetastingwashington@gmail.com   or find me on Facebook at Wine Tasting Washington